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Tropical Biology Section

Oyelana, Olatunji [1], Ogunwenmo, K. Olusola [1].

Floral biology and effect of insect-plant interaction on pollination intensity, fruit yield and seed set in seven species of Solanum L.

Pollination is achieved anytime between the opening of flowers (0520- 0835hrs.) and commencement of closing of flowers (1530-1700hrs). Anthesis occurred about 30 minutes after the opening of flowers in all species except the varieties of S. melongena and S. gilo where it occurred about 40 minutes prior to the opening of flowers. Pollen shed occurred intermittently for about 12 hours at anthesis. Pollen load ranged from 140,782 - 2,098,050 per plant. Pollination efficiency ranged from 73.9-98.2%. Unpollinated flowers reopened up to three days in experimented flowers and subsequently withered if pollination failed. Flowers were positioned at obtuse angle relative to the axis of the inflorescence and stem to ensure successful pollination. Flowers not so orientated recourse to insect pollination. Fertilised ovary matured in 3-5 weeks. Synchronized flowering periods afforded species the possibility of receiving crossed pollen. The species of Megachile and Diplolepsis made quick and repeated visits to flowers suggesting high pollen load and nutritive value. Maximal seed set (58-384) was dependent on the efficiency of pollination mechanism and complementary activities of insect visitors. Fruit set was 100% in artificially self-pollinated flowers, 77-88 (100) % in open pollination and 50-75 (100) % in bagged flowers.


1 - Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Dept. of Basic & Applied Sciences, PMB 21244, Ikeja, Lagos, Lagos, 100-001, Nigeria

Keywords:
pollination
Pollen load
Solanum
Anthesis
Flower opening and closing
Fruit and Seed set.

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: 32-138
Location: Special Event Center (Cliff Lodge)
Date: Tuesday, August 3rd, 2004
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:429


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