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Ecological Section

Stanford, Alice [1], Vanessa, Forbes [1].

Outcrossing mechanisms in Solanum conocarpum (Solanaceae), a rare Virgin Islandsí endemic.

Solanum conocarpum Dunal is a rare shrub endemic to St. John, US Virgin Islands. It is typically found in seasonally dry, coastal habitat, which is being rapidly depleted by development of resorts and housing communities. Isolated individuals within the Virgin Islands National Park appear to produce few fruits and no seedlings, while large populations (on private land) do produce seedlings. Under cultivation, plants have been observed to produce seedlings only when other individuals are present; therefore, some mechanism is thought to strongly promote outcrossing. Flowers were monitored for stigma receptivity and anther maturity to determine whether a mechanical method of promoting outcrossing existed. A series of controlled crosses (selfing and outcrossing) were conducted to detect self-incompatibility at the molecular level. Stigma receptivity was found to occur simultaneously with the opening of pores in the anther. Although the speciesí heteromorphic flowers probably promote outcrossing, the plants are believed to be self-incompatible at a molecular level as well.


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1 - University of the Virgin Islands, Division of Science and Mathematics, 2 John Brewers Bay, St Thomas, Virgin Islands, 00802-9990, USVI

Keywords:
Solanum
self-incompatibility
endemic
Endangered
Virgin Islands.

Presentation Type: Poster
Session: 32-35
Location: Special Event Center (Cliff Lodge)
Date: Tuesday, August 3rd, 2004
Time: 12:30 PM
Abstract ID:231


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